Time for a greener architecture

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The Gestalt school identified several principles of use to artists and architects, but the most important is that of balance – that is, the constantly shifting balance that balances all opposites within the constantly shifting matrix of reality. Interestingly the principles of form found in the natural world are not dissimilar to the Gestalt principles that also operate in the unselfconscious human building traditions I referred to at the beginning of this article. Vernacular building traditions have evolved slowly over long periods of time and thus possess some of the coherent organic order found also in Nature. As in animal architecture, vernacular architecture possesses an inherent beauty: the beauty of integrity and unity. Such beauty emerges from the totally balanced integration of a system, its function and use into the broader realms of Nature.

So have we stumbled onto the reason why so many modern human-made environments fail to come up to the quality of some older towns and cities? At root the problem seems to lie in the spiritual posture that we adopt with Nature. Many people would now accept that as humans we are completely co-terminal with Nature. However, in claiming ownership, as we do, of that part of Nature that we call -self’, we not only separate ourselves from Nature but also separate ourselves from our own environments. Yogis tell us that the transcendental world of the spirit – the world of unity and pure consciousness – supports the relative world at each point. They tell us that the transcendental realm is a world without qualities yet gives rise to and sustains all qualities. They tell us that it is to be found in the -gap’ between the different states of consciousness: waking, dreaming and sleep; in the silences in music; between syllables in spoken language and even between our thoughts. The great 19th-century Indian holy man Ramakrishna Paramahansa was once asked, -Where do I find God?- His reply was, -Look between two thoughts.- This gap between perfectly balanced opposites is where life and spirit enter the relative world. It is also the vital middle ground between a subject and an object that defines the -mean’ and gives the meaning.

In conclusion we can say that it is order that gives life to a work and it is order that gives a work its spiritual dimension. It is in the perfect orderliness of a great work that the two worlds of materiality and spirit conjoin. Order is the agent that serves as the conduit between these two realms. Dare we say that -orderliness’ is next to -Godliness’?

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An Initial Introduction To Interior Architecture

Interior architecture can be seen as different from architecture in that the interior rooms, halls, doorways + stairs can be re designed once the initial design for the architecture of the building as a whole is in place. Interior architecture can be used to completely re design, for example a room such as a kitchen, bathroom in a family home which is quite common or a meeting room or office layout in a business environment or modify the existing design based on original architecture.

The interior architecture of a building can be changed for many reasons, either practical, where the interior of a building is going to be used for a new purpose or due to changing fashions or updated technologies. Examples of this are very common in many towns and cities where the exterior of a building is in a style of when it was built, say in the late 19th century but it’s interior has been completely re vamped incorporating modern design fashions and the latest technology.

The use of interior architecture means that for many buildings over a hundred years old the development of the look and design of their interior and exterior could often be the work of many different architects or teams of architects. This has meant for many of our towns and cities the architecture on view can be widely varied and reflect many different periods of time, design fashions and architecture styles. Some of which can be seen as timeless whilst others from certain eras can be seen as garish and bad taste 20 – 30 years down the line.

However no matter what a buildings exterior may look like with the help of interior architects, refurbishment and fit out specialists the interior look and feel of many buildings can be totally transformed with enough time and money bringing them up to date, that is until the latest style, fashion and technologies need integrating a few years down the line.

The main thing to differentiate architecture + interior architecture is that an architect is concerned with the concept of designing a new building the interior architect is concerned with the modification of existing buildings, some of which the design can be seen as timeless and look good for centuries whilst other will be an eye saw and look dated within 10 – 30 years.

This is quite a large and interesting topic, for further reading would advise looking at books + articles, online, in bookshops, news agents or in libraries on architecture, design + interior design.
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